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Tewkesbury Park Hotel and Golf Club

A Dog-Friendly Short Break in Tewkesbury

We dog lovers are really not that hard to please. For the ideal dog-friendly break, we only require a few things:

  • A comfortable, grown-up hotel where dogs and their traveling companions are not made to feel like pariahs, relegated to the smelly room next to the laundry.
  • Lots of outdoors to run around in; fields, forests, or sandy beaches will do – we’re not fussy.
  • A good choice of attractions, at least some of which welcome dogs as well as people

A few dog-friendly coffee shops or pubs don’t hurt either.

Last month Lulu the Westie and I, along with her Westie pal Darcy and his human chums, discovered Tewkesbury, a medieval market town at the confluence of the Rivers Severn and Avon. Just two and a half hours northwest of London, the Gloucestershire town beneath the Malvern Hills sits on the Northern edge of the Cotswolds.  It has, we discovered, everything needed for a dog-friendly break and then some.  

Where to Stay

Tewkesbury Park , was named”Fido’s Favorite – Best Pet Friendly Hotel”  in the 2017/18  bestlovedhotels awards. What better recommendation for a Westie outing?  We went (at the invitation of the owners) to check it out.

The family-owned hotel in a converted 18th and 19th century manor house has been undergoing a dramatic programme of refurbishment.  In late 2017 a series of glamorous “heritage suites” (lovely but not dog-friendly) and a wing of ground floor, dog-friendly rooms were launched.

Public areas, including an informal reception, a dog-friendly piano lounge, a bar and several comfortable sitting areas, are spacious and airy, decorated in soothing combinations of French blue, mellow yellow, grey and taupe. Have a look:

Photo courtesy of Tewkesbury Park Hotel
Photography at Tewkesbury Park Hotel, Spring 2016
One of several cocktail bars.

Rooms in the dog-friendly wing are comfortably furnished in a contemporary, country house style – tartan carpets, memory foam beds (one for you and a memory-foam doggy bed for Fido). Ours had plenty of closet and drawer space, two comfortable chairs, a table and a dressing table with enough power points for all my chargers and devices.

Dog friendly rooms at Tewkesbury Park overlook the golf course
Dog-friendly room overlooking the golf course. ©Ferne Arfin 2018

The hotel sits on what seems to be the highest hill in Tewkesbury, with views of rolling countryside in all directions. It’s surrounded by an 18-hole golf course which is  “Highly Recommended” by Golfshake and gets good marks from UKGolfGuide and Leading Courses.

Great for golfers but less so for travelers with pets. The dog-friendly rooms are all on the ground floor with French doors onto the golf course (which are unusable, as you can exit but not re-enter through them).  As soon as we arrived, Lulu found the doors to the grassy lawns madly exciting.  And the golfers, who pass frequently in close proximity to the hotel, found Lulu – her nose pressed against the glass – entertaining as well.  So much for rooms with views, privacy or morning daylight.  The curtains had to remain firmly shut through our entire stay.

On the plus side:
  • the staff are universally helpful and welcoming.
  • the hotel’s peaceful spa has a reasonably-sized, heated pool, steam room, sauna and outdoor hot tub (a bit of a challenge to get into on a wintry evening though) as well as a gym. A variety of treatments are available too.
  • the breakfast buffet is generous and varied (but leave Fido in your room because the buffet is laid out in a separate room, down a corridor and a short flight of steps, from the piano lounge where dogs are allowed. It makes for a bit of a juggling act and someone has to stay behind with your pooch).
  • if you opt for a dinner bed and breakfast package, Fido gets a special meal, cooked to order in the hotel kitchen.
Chef prepared meals for Fido at Tewkesbury Manor.
Party manners – Lulu is attentive and on best behaviour as food and beverage manager Leon puts the finishing touches to her room service meal of chicken, rice and gravy.

The Canine Retreat package costs £199 for two plus one pampered pooch and includes a welcome pack of doggy treats with suggested walks, bed and breakfast accommodation,  a traditional afternoon tea, a £25 spa voucher and a three-course dinner for two as well as a dog’s dinner. Lulu enjoyed her generous chicken, rice and gravy supper. As is common in the travel industry, we were guests of the hotel.

Where to Eat

The Tewkesbury Park Hotel  has a competent restaurant with a menu based as much as possible on locally sourced ingredients as well as a varied, reasonably priced and well-chosen wine list.  Quite a few wines – including champagnes – are available by the glass and the selection of moderately priced bottles is very good. Most of Europe is represented on the list as well as a few New World wines from South America and South Africa. 

But my oh my what gorgeous desserts. Go if only to finish your meal by sampling the genius pudding efforts of Chef de Patisserie Dinesh.

White chocolate and passionfruit panacotta with blood orange sorbet, gels, meringues, nuts and bits of greenery. Divine.

A white chocolate and passion fruit panacotta, topped with tangy blood orange sorbet, was wobbly and sweet yet interestingly astringent. A companion’s dark chocolate and praline mousse looked both light and rich – how is that possible? He reported that the balance of flavours worked very well.

The restaurant at Tewksbury Park is fully licenced, so you don’t have to be a hotel guest to dine there. Elsewhere in the town, pickings are pretty slim though we have heard good things about My Great Grandfathers and The Abbot’s Table.

Things to do in Tewkesbury

We don’t know if Tewkesbury is trying to attract dog lovers but there certainly seemed to be a lot of “dogs welcome”  signs on the doors of coffee shops, cafes and pubs around the town.

Other things to do with your canine companion:

  • Visit Tewkesbury AbbeyMore than 900 years old and a Benedictine Abbey before the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII,  the Abbey Church was saved from total destruction when the townspeople bought it from the King for the price of the lead in its roof. It’s now a monumental parish church with seven impressive medieval stained glass windows and, at 14 metres square and 45 metres high, the largest Norman church tower in existence, anywhere. Remarkably, it is completely dog-friendly. Your well-behaved pet is even welcome during services and concerts.
  • Explore this ancient market town. It has 379 listed historic buildings, a photo op around every corner. There are at least 30 interesting alleyways worth a look including Old Baptist Chapel Court, leading to the 17th century Old Baptist Burial Ground and Meeting House.
  • Enjoy the rivers. The upper reaches of the Severn and the River Avon come together here. There are peaceful, dog-friendly walks along the mighty Severn, Britain’s longest river, and boat trips on the Avon with views of medieval cottages and an ancient mill.  Severn Leisure Cruises offer ferry services and half hour pleasure cruises around the town and between Tewkesbury and Twyning from April to September.
  • Follow the Battle of Tewkesbury Trail – The Battle of Tewkesbury in May 1471 was a turning point in the Wars of the Roses, putting the House of York in power for the next 14 years. Much of the battlefield remains undeveloped rolling meadow and woodland, perfect for dog walking leavened with a bit of history. Pick up a map leaflet in the Tourist Information Centre on Church Street, near the Abbey, and head out.

Tewkesbury  Gallery

Tewkesbury Abbey, a 900-year-old Abbey saved from destruction by the locals and now a parish church.
inside Tewkesbury Abbey
The vaulted ceiling of the nave of Tewkesbury Abbey.
Ceiling above the high altar
One of seven medieval stained glass windows at Tewkesbury Abbey.
17th century courtyard in Tewkesbury, site of a historic Baptist Chapel.
Old Baptist Chapel Court. Courtyard in Tewkesbury, site of a historic Baptist Chapel. The town was a center for nonconformists in the 17th century.
Old Baptist Burial Ground at the end of Old Baptist Chapel Court. The court is one of 30 ancient lanes that wind through the town.
Listed historical buildings in Tewkesbury
Evocative of 17th and 18th century – or much earlier, these houses are a typical sight around the town. Tewkesbury has more than 370 listed historical buildings.

Explore the region on a two-day tour of the Cotswolds with Get Your Guide

Things to do nearby

Toff Milway and visitors at his Conderton Studio
Potter Toff Milway explains his working methods to visitors at his Conderton studio, near Tewkesbury.
Visit the Conderton Pottery 

Shop for beautiful and original salt-glazed pots, jugs, platters and planters at ceramic artist Toff Milway’s studio in Conderton,  about 6.5 miles on the B4080 from Tewkesbury.  Milway is friendly and generous with his time.  If you are genuinely interested he will take the time to explain the mysteries of salt-glazing and how the subtle colours, gentle iridescence and interesting textures of his work are achieved. The Old Forge, Conderton Near Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire GL20 7PP.

Both sides of a salt-glazed jug with fish handle, by Toff Milway of Conderton Pottery. Ceramic artwork shown with permission of the artist. ©Ferne Arfin 2018


Admire Roman interior decoration in Corinium 

After Londinium,  Corinium, was the second largest city in Roman Britain. Today it’s known as Cirencester and it’s a 40 minute drive from Tewkesbury but well worth the effort to see the national collection of Romano-British mosaics at the Corinium Museum. 

 If you get the munchies, stop off along the way in the spa and racing town of Cheltenham, where local girl turned world traveller, Emma, of The Gap Life Diaries, recommends a handful of tempting, relaxed, all day eateries.

Above and below, details of mosaic floors at Corinium Roman Museum in Cirencester.

 The mosaic floors, most discovered in Cirencester but some brought from other Roman sites, offer a fascinating glimpse into the lives of first and second century  Romans in Britannia.

There’s a small admission charge to the Corinium Museum which, unfortunately, is not dog-friendly.  But medieval Church of St. John the Baptist, nearby, is.

Porch of Church of John the Baptist in Cirencester’s market square. The English perpendicular Gothic church is what is left of an Augustinian monastery destroyed by Henry VIII

The 900 year old church, built in the English Perpendicular Gothic style, is all that remains of a former Augustinian monastery (yes, Henry VIII at it again).  Cirencester’s ancient street plan includes twisting passages and alleys lined with independent shops. In one of them, The Stableyard on Black Jack Street, we stopped for coffee at Jesse’s, an interesting looking dog-friendly bistro that we later found out has two AA rosettes and is listed in The Good Food Guide, Hardens and the 2016 Michelin Guide. So a return visit is probably in the cards.


Blakes Hotel in South Kensington, the Original Boutique Hotel

40 Rooms for £40 at one of London’s Most Glamourous Hotels

The year was 1978.  In London Glam Rockers were on the wane but the equally flamboyant New Romantics were beginning to spread their langourous style onto the fashion scene. Design was everything – the more ecclectic, individual and luxurious the better.

Onto this stage stepped Anouska Hempel, socialite, former Bond girl, Hammer House of Horror and Dr. Who actress now turned designer and hotelier.  Her first hotel venture, Blakes Hotel on Roland Gardens in South Kensington, reflected the exotic extravagance of the period.

Each room was individually designed with doubles and signature suites expressing the kinds of elegant fantasies that instantly appealed to the rich and famous.

Though some hoteliers in New York would like to take credit for the invention of the boutique hotel in the 1980s, Blakes  was undoubtedly the first luxury boutique hotel in the world. Movie stars, rock legends and super models flocked to its theatrical rooms with their – gypsy flamboyance, sexy red velvets, Victorian stripes, Asian and colonial styles,  beds draped in embroidered hangings or floating in airy netting.(Check out the gallery)

Glam lounge at Blakes Hotel in South Kensington - a magnet for movie stars, supermodels and rockers.
One of several glamorous lounges at Blakes Hotel

Blakes is 40 years old in 2018, still going strong and still attracting the rich and famous – who treasure its exclusive privacy.  It’s an ambiance you can share – at a bargain basement price – if you’re quick.

To celebrate its 40th anniversary, the hotel is offering 40 rooms for only £40 during the month of January.  The rooms, from the hotel’s selection of Parisian doubles,  would normally go for £295 a night. It’s first come, first serve and it’s just one room per person – if you are lucky enough to land one.

The rooms go on sale on Monday, January 8 at 9 a.m. They will be bookable between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. during January for as long as they last. To be in with a chance, telephone +44 (0)20 7370 6701 or email reservations@blakeshotels.com    A little bird tells me you’ll have a better chance of getting a room if you phone.

Good luck.


Christmas at Waddesdon 2017

Winter Light at Waddesdon – Christmas 2017

Christmas festivities at Waddesdon Manor in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, are always extravagant fun.

This year, they’ll have a hard time topping the wonderful installations and events of 2016, when the grounds of the former Rothschild estate positively glowed with the Field of Light. But, in 2017, they’ve had a good go and they’ve given the video design students of the Guildhall School of Music & Drama a real chance to shine. 

In creating Waddesdon Imaginarium, seven Guildhall students experimented with 3D scanning and video projection technology to cover the entire front of Baron Ferdinand Rothschild’s faux French chateau with an animated parade of dancing clocks, 18th century portraits, fluttering butterflies and moths, flowers and porcelain animals – all scanned from objects in the Waddesdon Collection. 

The performance, accompanied by an original score and synchronized lighting effects, used 14 large format projectors to cover the1,700 square metre facade with a dazzling 12-minute display. The score was created by 111 Guildhall students in the BMus (Hons) programs in Electronic Music and Jazz.

My jittery videos should give you a taste of the spectacle.

Inside Waddesdon, artists and designers were invited to design decorations around the theme of an Enchanted Menagerie, drawing on the artworks and objects in the rooms for inspiration.

Enchanted Menagerie in the Smoking room
Imaginary animals decorate the Christmas tree in the Smoking Room.
Noah's Ark at Waddesdon Manor
Noah’s Ark on the Billiards Table

Meanwhile, The Electric Menagerie – neon animals, created by American multi-media artist Lauren Booth, lit up unexpected corners of the estate.

Electric Menagerie by Lauren Booth. The Aviary. Photo by Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor.

And because it wouldn’t be Christmas without an opportunity to stock up on holiday gifts, this year’s Waddesdon Christmas Fair is arrayed along the front promenade leading to the house. The fair features food, drink, produce and crafts from local artisan producers and national independent traders. Lots of it is very tempting.  We left with shopping bags full.

Waddesdon Christmas Essentials

  • Christmas festivities at Waddesdon are on from now to January 2 (except December 24-26), 11am to 6pm 
  • Waddesdon Imaginarium, the sound and light show, begins at dusk every evening during the holiday opening hours.
  • The Christmas Market, with 80 decorated wooden chalets is open until December 10.
  • Visit the Waddesdon Manor website to find out more. 
Everyone is beautiful at the Chiltern Firehouse in Marylebone - even if the food is gaspingly expensive.

Everyone is Beautiful at the Chiltern Firehouse

I had enjoyed a small personal victory and wanted to treat myself to a very nice lunch. The Marylebone area – particularly between Marylebone High Street and Baker Street is full of nice little places. 

But somehow as I walked through the side streets towards Baker Street Tube, my ultimate destination, nothing really struck my fancy.  

Then I arrived at what appeared to be a garden terrace. An attendent manned the entrance. He was wearing a suit and tie and he was beautiful. There was no sign as far as I could see.

“Is this a restaurant?” I asked him.


“What kind of food do you serve?”


“Where is the entrance?” I still didn’t see any sign, any obvious way in or any menu posted discretely on an outside wall,as required by law in London

“Right this way,” he said, and ushered me into the garden. I still didn’t know where I was.

Eventually, a hostess offered to find me a seat inside (the garden was nearly full except for the bits of  it that would soon be rained on). She was tall, slim and dressed in a fabulous two piece number in a dark leafy green. She was beautiful.

Inside, the restaurant was packed and buzzing. Another hostess, in a similarly designerish outfit, all in blue (also beautiful) offered me a seat at the bar. I hate sitting on bar stools but eventually she found me a seat at a sort of banquette with high single tables, facing the bar. The bartender and wine steward were beautifully dressed and beautiful (as you can see in the picture above). 

It was only when someone finally handed me a menu, that I realized I had randomly stumbled into the Chiltern Firehouse, once one of London’s hottest celebrity haunts. The restaurant, with its kitchen “curated” by Michelin-starred chef Nuno Mendes, has cooled down some since the virtual hysteria of its opening months in 2014. But, people still wait weeks to book this place, and there I was settling in, by accident, after a Wednesday afternoon stroll.

All around me, beautiful people were tucking into gorgeous looking food. Nips, tucks and tans as far as the eye could see. And when my food finally arrived, it was absolutely beautiful to look at too.

Did I mention that everyone – and everything – is beautiful at the Chiltern Firehouse.

I ate a salad of heritage tomatoes with strawberries, a slice of sourdough bread, an omelet of crabmeat and lobster (pictured here) that was the strangest looking omelet with the oddest texture that I’ve ever eaten. It was delicious and I am very curious to know how it was made but I hope I’m not offending the chef when I say it did not satisfy my desire for a nice, tender, eggy omelet. It was something else entirely. 

Lobster, crab and shiso leaves decorate the strangest omelet I've ever eaten, at the Chiltern Firehouse in Marylebone, London.
Lobster, crab and shiso leaves decorate the strange, mysterious looking omelet at the Chiltern Firehouse.©Ferne Arfin 2017

Oh, and I did treat myself to a glass of Ruinart NV champagne – well I did say I was celebrating.

And with a black coffee to finish, and the 15% tip, the price of my special lunch of omelet, salad and champagne came to an eye-watering £79.93. 

Was it worth it? Well, it was a very nice lunch but I think if you have to ask about value for money, this probably isn’t your kind of place. I’m not actually sure when it will next be mine.

The Nitty Gritty

The restaurant and attached boutique hotel are owned by André Balasz who also owns the legendary Chateau  Marmont in Hollywood, The Mercer in New York’s Soho,  the Sunset Beach on Shelter Island and Standard hotels around America.

  • The Chiltern Firehouse
  • 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 7PA
  • Telephone +44 020 7073 7676
  • Open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner and Saturday and Sunday for brunch. Check the restaurant website for opening times which vary from day to day.



Thank Goodness for Days Inn. Really? Yes Really!

My friend, my dog and I had spent a few days in France in May. We stayed in several luxury hotels that were, on the whole, long on charm but (with one exception) very short on space. 

photo courtesy of Days Inn, Maidenhead.

The last day of our trip was a long one with a lot of driving and a late ferry crossing. My friend had suggested we book a room at the halfway mark to break the journey. It’s only 80 miles from the Dover Ferry Port to West London (a two hour drive, the AA rather optimistically suggests) so that didn’t seem necessary. 

But roadworks on the M20 heading out of Dover turned our first hour on the road into a 20-mile, single-lane nightmare of orange cones looming out of total darkness, punctuated by the glare of oncoming lorries.  By the time we pulled into the Junction 8 service area on the M20 in Maidstone,  my eyes were burning and my jaw was clenched. I was thankful I’d taken her advice.

It was a Days Inn.

I’d never stayed in one before and if you’d asked me, before this trip, what I thought of the brand, I probably would have said, not a lot. Their no-frills websites with tiny pictures and lurid colours set in an electric blue background were not very tempting. But it was where we needed to stop and it was cheap (£68 for both of us plus the dog) so I booked it.

We arrived, bedraggled, at around midnight. Because you pay for these rooms online, in advance check-in is totally painless.  I just handed over a printout of my reservation in exchange for a digital card “key” and directions to our room.  That was it. No formalities, nothing to sign, nothing to pay.

The room, after several days on the Continent, seemed huge – a separate king-sized bed for each of us plus a pair of upholstered arm-chairs. There were plenty of outlets for our chargers, extra pillows in the cupboard, tea and coffee-making things, flat-screen television and a large, spotless shower room.

Bags of style? No, just your basic, early 21st century motel room. And maybe the towels were a little on the stiff side. But it was clean, comfortable, quiet and there. As I stretched out on the first bed I’d been offered in five days that was actually big enough to stretch out on, I thought, “Thank God for Days Inn. Who knew?”

My life on the road is just full of surprises.

Check out what other guests think on Tripadvisor and book this hotel.


© Ferne Arfin 2017

Hightlights of a Tour in Champagne Country – First Stop Reims

The Lady of Champagne

I’m just back from a tour of Champagne country. Together with a small group of professional travel writers, I walked the cobbles, mounted the stairs, descended into the cellars and climbed the hills of a handful of towns and villages in the multi-departmental region now known as La Champagne (to differentiate it from the drink which is le champagne).

During the course of a week in the region we wandered through several astonishingly beautiful churches and cathedrals, admired local architecture, visited vineyards and cellars, learned all about how champagne is made and what the method champenoise really means,  ate lots of regional specialities and, naturally, drank gallons of delicious bubbly.

I’m not a wine writer so I won’t foist my tasting notes on you because they would be meaningless.  And surprisingly, you don’t really visit La Champagne for le champagne anyway. You can save yourself the cost of the trip and spend the money on really expensive bottles at home instead.

But of course, there are dozens of wonderful and compelling reasons to visit this region.  Starting with today’s post  and continuing with several more, I’ll be sharing some of them – the highlights of a truly memorable trip.

In the interests of full disclosure:  I traveled with more than 100 members of the British Guild of Travel Writers who spread out, in small groups, all over the region. Our travel was sponsored by the official tourism authorities of Champagne-Ardenne , Aube  and Haute-Marne  and enhanced by the generosity of several dozen champagne producers.

First Stop Reims

Reims Cathedral

Notre-Dame de Reims

Reims Cathedral, perched on the site where Clovis, first king of the Franks was baptized by Saint Remi, is a battle-scarred survivor. Risen, in 1211, from the ashes of an earlier church destroyed by fire, Notre-Dame de Reims has repeatedly suffered damage from wind, fire and war throughout its 806 year history.

Its towers had barely been completed when they were damaged by a roof fire. In the 18th century an angel atop the bell tower was sent flying in a tempest. And in World War I, the cathedral took 300 direct hits from German artillery. Restoration took 40 years and buckets of Rockefeller money.

Yet through it all, the cathedral’s 806-year-old  gothic bones remain virtually intact, its façade a medieval masterpiece.

Statues on Reims Cathedral ©Ferne Arfin 2017

An army of statues large and small – saints, biblical figures, angels, more than any cathedral except Chartres – parades across the east front. Look out, especially, for the smiling angel, beheaded by a shell in 1914, restored in 1926 and an icon of the city.

The Cathedral sits in the center of the city, beside the Palais du Tau, the ancient Bishop’s Palace, now a museum. Try to see it after dark when the wildly exuberant creativity of centuries of stone carvers dazzles in the spotlights like giddy champagne bubbles frozen in stone.

© Ferne Arfin 2017
Close up of Reims Cathedral, bursting with extravagant detail

Les Crayères

Beneath the city of Reims a network of Gallo Roman chalk quarries provide the perfect atmosphere for making champagne.  Thats why at least 20 major champagne houses, some of the most famous labels in the world,  are headquartered here.  Taittinger, Mumms, Pommery, Heidsieck, Krug, and Veuve Clicquot – known affectionately in the UK where it is a favorite, as the Widow – have turned Reims into the modern capital of La Champagne.

Les Crayères, as they are known, are part of a listed UNESCO World Heritage site. In their cool, dark, interconnected passages, millions of bottles of champagne quietly come of age.

We’ve been invited to tour the subterranean depths of Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin, 482 chambers spread out across almost 24 kilometers.

Les Crayeres
Down into les crayeres at Veuve Clicquot

Our guide in the cellars explains the méthode champenoise. The wine, made from a secret blend of chardonnay, pinot noir and meunier grapes, undergoes a second fermentation in the bottles. That’s what produces the bubbles.

Riddling the bottles
Guide explains riddling – an element of the methode champenoise invented by the Widow Clicquot

She’s surrounded by bottles, slotted at a fixed angle in “riddling tables” that encourage the yeast and grape sediment to move toward the neck.

Over a period of time, the bottles are gently turned – riddled – to help the process along, a method used throughout the industry but apparently invented by the Widow herself in the early 19th century. What happens next – called disgorgement – can best be described as a sort of yeasty burp. The bottles are uncapped and the pressure of the carbon dioxide they contain pushes the plug of sediment out of the bottle. These days the necks of the bottles are also chilled to -26° C keeping the plug of frozen sediment intact  as it bursts from the bottle.

Public cellar tours, bookable in advance, are available weekdays and range in price from 25€ to 150€ – information from their website.

A highlight is a view of a 170-year-old bottle, part of a cargo retrieved from a sunken vessel in the Baltic Sea in 2010 and apparently still drinkable.

Only in Champagne

Eight in the morning on the Rue Buirette. On the wide, pink and grey tesselated pavement, a stall holder unrolls his awnings, opens his cabinets and counters,  turns on strings of festive lights and sets out his wares.

Oysters and Shellfish in Reims © Ferne Arfin

In Paris, these might be magazines and newpapers, sweets and mints and cigarettes. But this is the capital of la Champagne. And though we are more than 250 miles from the sea, his offering is the natural accompaniment for le champagne, huîtres et coquillages – oysters and shellfish, of course.

Come back soon for more travels in Champagne Country – Find Part 2 Here.